Friday, March 24, 2017
   
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Politics and Economy

European Union: A Socialist and Liberal Superstate

This article is a finalization of a discussion about potential problems caused by joining European Union for Poland. In the previous articles we were writing about Problems in Polish Agriculture, and a Risk of Poland being in European Backyard. We were also talking about fear of sell-out of Polish land to foreigners.

Below, more arguments of Euro-skeptics:

European Union is a superstate

EU stands above the local government. It dictates the law for each member-country. It also creates a huge bureaucracy, people who sit in their offices in Brussels and are convinced that they know the best what is good for the foreign country that they never even made an attempt to visit. The Euro-skeptics are afraid that this European Union's super-government would be something like a Soviet Union in the past for the satellite countries of Eastern Europe. It will dictate the member-countries what they should do. It is a first experiment of this kind in the world - such a close union of different countries.

Read more: European Union: A Socialist and Liberal Superstate

 

EU Disadvantages: Polish Agriculture and European Union

There are many people who are against Poland's joining EU. They are called Euro-skeptics. Euro-skeptics are of course not only in Poland but also in many other countries-candidates. In Poland Euro-skeptics are rather a minority, but an important one. Their voice is heard through many mass media. The most important mass media of Euro-skeptics are probably "Radio Maryja", "Nasz Dziennik" and "Gazeta Polska". Recently the biggest organized political party which is openly against EU is so called Self-defence - a farmer party, in Polish Samoobrona led by Andrzej Leppert.

Read more: EU Disadvantages: Polish Agriculture and European Union

   

European Union's Copenhagen Summit

Poland had initially asked for the extra 2bn euros to be made available - arguing that without extra subsidy its farmers would face ruin inside the European single market. The Polish prime minister, Leszek Miller, flew to Copenhagen under heavy pressure from a suspicious public, especially farmers and Euro-skeptics that are accusing that Poland is being treated as a second-class member of the EU club.

Read more: European Union's Copenhagen Summit

   

EU Accession of Poland and other Eastern European Countries: A Deal is Reached

In December 2002 a meeting in Copenhagen took place where the expansion deal with ten candidate countries was reached. Among these countries four are ex-Soviet satellites (Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland and Hungary), three belonged to Soviet Union before (Baltic Republics: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) and two are small countries from outside the Eastern Europe (Malta and Cyprus).

Read more: EU Accession of Poland and other Eastern European Countries: A Deal is Reached

   

Work Ethics in Poland: Hidden Unemployment and Weak Currency

During communism there was no unemployment in Poland as well as in all other countries of the Eastern Block at least formally. But in reality the organization of work was poor. People earned little money. Sometimes many people were doing a work that could be done effectively by a one person. There was too much of administration and managers (and still there is). Many people were overqualified for what they were doing. They were employed in the position below their education level. This phenomenon was called hidden unemployment.

Read more: Work Ethics in Poland: Hidden Unemployment and Weak Currency

   

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