Friday, March 24, 2017
   
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Modern History XIX - XX

Twenty Years after Chernobyl Nuclear Accident

Chernobyl's nuclear accident occurred on the night of April 25th to 26th, 1986 during its test run. This was just the beginning of my work in the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow, my first real job. After we had heard about the accident my boss handed me a nuclear dosimeter (radiation counter) asking to look around and check the levels of radiation. I was walking on the grounds of the Institute monitoring the level of radiation. I remember this day, I was inspecting the area, sidewalks, roads and even checking the dose of radiation on bottom of peoples' shoes.

Read more: Twenty Years after Chernobyl Nuclear Accident

 

Trip from the French Front Home, Part I - From the Memoirs of Franek Gwiozdzik

This is the next part, very adventurous, of the memoirs of Franciszek Gwiozdzik, who served, as all Silesians had to serve, in the Wehrmacht during the World War II.

I had good luck again! Something happened that I would remember for the rest of my life. It was Friday, June 30, 1944. A telephone message came to our commander that "Kanionier (bombardier) Franz Gwiozdzik is to be ready to go at 8 A.M., in full uniform, to report to the regiment command post." I tried to learn what this was about, but I learned only that a supply car would take me to the regiment headquarters.

Read more: Trip from the French Front Home, Part I - From the Memoirs of Franek Gwiozdzik

   

From the Memoirs of Franek Gwiozdzik - the Beginnings of the War

Thank you for so much positive feedback on the first part of the memoirs of Frank Gwiozdzik, who served in the Wehrmacht, as did all Poles from those regions of Poland incorporated by Germany as part of the Reich. Here is the beginning of his story.

Read more: From the Memoirs of Franek Gwiozdzik - the Beginnings of the War

   

On the Wrong Side of the Frontline

As I already pointed out in the previous article, the majority of Poles in the regions annexed to Germany during World War II, especially in Upper Silesia, were treated like second-class German citizens. The whole Silesian population was divided into four categories - the first two included people who were members of German political, cultural or sport organizations or had pure German blood. The third category, so-called "volksdeutch" (folk Germans or country Germans) were people of mixed blood and mixed culture who spoke either German or Silesian at home. The Silesian language is just a Polish dialect, mixed with some German and Czech words.

Read more: On the Wrong Side of the Frontline

   

Different War in Different Parts of Poland

The approach to World War II by many Western historians is overly simplified: there was one aggressor - Germany and one victim - Jewish people in teh effect of Holocaust. This so-called "Allied Scheme of History" was criticized by Norman Davies and other historians, experts on Central and Eastern Europe.

Read more: Different War in Different Parts of Poland

   

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