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Polish Poster Art from Allison Campbell's Collection

Polish poster art is famous all around the world. Polish artists, among them Waldemar Swierzy, Jan Mlodozeniec, Franciszek Starowiejski or Henryk Tomaszewski gained international reputation. They created the so-called Polish school of poster. Their work was displayed in many exhibitions, galleries and museums around the world and became highly prized by collectors. They brought the art of wall posters to new levels, using often-flashy combinations of color and images that could be humorous and clever or grotesque and shocking.

One of the promoters of Polish poster art is Allison Campbell. Allison became enchanted by Polish poster art while being on the fellowship in Poland and decided to establish on-line store with Polish poster art in Alexandria, VA. Allison in her collection features 10 Polish artists.

Allison decided to donate two posters for sweepstakes from the collection of Jan Mlodozeniec. She chose Mlodozeniec because he is already a history. Mlodozeniec died just a couple of days ago (Dec. 12, 2000). He was 71. Mlodozeniec created about 400 posters on film, theater and circus themes. Mlodozeniec received many awards in Poland and abroad. Both donated posters were made for theater performances. One poster advertises a performance of "Wesele" (Engl. "Wedding"), classical Polish drama from the beginning of XX century about inability of Poles to fight for independence. Another presents a performance of Russian writer Chekov called "33 omdlenia" (Engl. "33 faintings").

Allison's relationship with Poland started when she was in college at Emory University studying International
Relations. She studied the Solidarity movement, Polish history and became a great fan of Andrzej Wajda, famous Polish director, Oscar award winner in 2000. In 1986, she enrolled at George Washington University, D.C to study Russian and East European Studies. Finally she made her way to Poland in 1990 on a US State Department Fellowship working at the US Embassy in Warsaw. Allison fell in love with the country. Poland became my adopted country (she herself was adopted and did not know of her birth heritage).

In 1990 Poland was in the throes of a democratic and economic revolution. One of the most beautiful aspects of Warsaw, at that time, was the street art. The streets were an art gallery. Posters heralding cultural events, elections, films, theatre and opera productions were abundant, beautiful and striking against buildings that were gray, dreary and covered with pollution from the burning of coal. In addition to the country, Allison fell in love with Polish poster art.

She began to collect Polish poster art and additionally had the pleasure of meeting master Polish poster artist Waldemar Swierzy. This year Allison Campbell opened an on-line store distributing Polish poster art after nine years of working on various international development projects in Poland and other countries. She is a new entrepreneur attempting to share her love of Polish graphic design art.

Her store offers first edition prints that are dry-mounted on white foam board. The prints are so colorful that they look great hanging without frames. She also sells some poster prints and can order a print of any poster on her website.

Update:

The store offered two posters worth 130$ in our first Sweepstakes which were held until January 31, 2001. Allison discontinued her Internet store, but you can buy Polish posters under the following address: Polish Poster Art
 

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